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Picture of William Heisel

Consumers Union takes up my challenge to help put hospital-acquired infections on the map — literally. 

Picture of William Heisel

Missed Coachella Live? Health journalists have their own version this week at the Association of Health Care Journalists Conference in Atlanta. Here's a preview.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Hospitals across the country are using near-total discretion in the way they disclose infections that occur as a result of surgeries, cause over 8,000 deaths annually in the U.S., and cost an additional $10 billion per year to the healthcare system, a new study underscoring the need for public reporting standards has found.

Picture of Michael  Douglas, MD, MBA

Going into the second day of oral arguments before the Supreme Court regarding the constitutionality of the reform law, a new round of polling suggests that antipathy toward that buzzphrase — "individual mandate" — comes from a slim majority of the public.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Health reform goes to the Supreme Court, environmental health woes in Mecca, and possible new regulation for Calif. medical marijuana users, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Kristen Natividad

In addition to a new crop of editor and reporter listings across the country, we feature an opportunity for a dynamic tech blogger to cover the healthcare beat with personality. Also, check out the variety of fellowships and awards listed.

Picture of William Heisel

Why do people in Montana know more about their cows than their healthcare-acquired infections like MRSA? And what does that mean for patient safety?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Is health reform to "blame" for sea changes in San Francisco's experiment in universal access to health care for city residents? Learn more and get tips for reporting on health reform in your own community.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

A confluence of factors including an inflexible regulatory enviroment that discourages research and discovery, a paltry research pipeline for drugs for the most serious illnesses, and a tendency for physicians to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics for routine aches and pains is largely responsible for the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections in humans, speakers at a major conference on infectious diseases this week announced.

Picture of Barbara Grady

What one journalist learned while reporting on San Francisco's program to provide access to health care for all of its residents.

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