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Picture of Betsy  Cliff

While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

Picture of Kent Bottles

Anyone who is concerned about the future transformation of the United States clinical delivery system should pay attention to the Care Innovations Summit.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Over the weekend, I took a long look at what the health-reform law does to address a looming shortage of primary care doctors. And the short answer is: Not much.

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Melissa Sweet

The controversy sparks questions about corporate influence and the new ways we fund journalism.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today's news roundup features the good and the bad in the fight against AIDS, health questions about food in cans, and a book for your long weekend. The Daily Briefing will go offline until Monday, so we sign off with some (health-related) Thanksgiving reads.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Chris Seper is looking for an editor for MedCity News and while he's not looking for a social media expert, he does want someone who understands search and writing for the web. This week in Career GPS, he answers questions about the position.

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