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Are nursing home workers with criminal records really endangering residents? It's hard to tell from a new inspector general's report.

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The San Francisco Public Press, a startup news organization doing public-affairs reporting in the Bay Area, is producing an in-depth explanatory project examining the track record of a city-sponsored health care program called Healthy San Francisco.

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This story is Part 12 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

John Grimm knows the city of Gary faces severe financial problems and didn’t expect city crews to plow all of its streets overnight after the recent blizzard.

But Grimm, the executive director of the South Shore Health & Rehabilitation Center in Gary, said during and after the storm city leaders failed to protect some of Gary’s most vulnerable residents when its crews neglected to plow the alleys and streets surrounding the nursing home.

Grimm said for an entire week the streets around the long-term care facility were not plowed, which he said “put the lives of many residents in jeopardy, as ambulances and emergency medical services and other medical providers were not able to access the facility.”

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This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

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This story is Part 10 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Methodist Hospitals’ financial turnaround has impressed hospital analysts and bond ratings agencies.

In May, New York bond-rating firm Standard & Poor’s changed its outlook on Methodist’s long-term bonds from negative to stable, reflecting its “improved operating performance and an improved balance sheet in fiscal 2009.”

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This story is Part 6 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

In the next three years Methodist Hospitals Northlake in Gary faces perhaps the greatest challenge of its 101-year history.

Health care reform is expected to reduce the rolls of uninsured Gary patients and expand health care access to thousands. But by 2014 the city’s only acute care hospital must figure out how to replace millions of dollars in government funding scheduled to disappear.

 

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Consumers Union is offering a great opportunity for people focused on health care and health journalism to make their voices heard.

From now until next Friday, Feb. 25, Consumer Union’s Safe Patient Project will be gathering opinions from people about Medicare’s new Physician Compare site to submit as part of Medicare’s open comment period on the site.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

California scored in the lowest quartile among all states in its health care system's provision of services for children in a new Commonwealth Fund report, and the reasons behind it have very much to do with budget priorities. But there are also the complex issues of immigration and access to care that are not so easily resolved.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

A Commonwealth Fund survey compares the states on childrens' health care access and treatment, and California ranks in the bottom quartile.

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