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heart disease

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Southern California’s The Press-Enterprise newspaper recently published an extensively reported, in-depth look at air pollution in the Inland Empire and invited community members to a discussion about ways to improve the situation.

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People who live in the country's industrial zones and experience its pollution already feel the effects of what a hotter planet will bring as carbon levels climb and air quality steadily worsens, resulting in higher rates of asthma, allergies, respiratory ills and even heart disease.

Picture of William Heisel

When in doubt, call it heart disease. This seems to be the mantra of many in medicine, unfortunately, according to a recent study in Preventing Chronic Disease. The study found evidence that heart disease is too frequently reported as a cause of death when other causes are more likely culprits.

Picture of Amanda Mascarelli

Researchers are growing increasingly aware that the prenatal period and early childhood are exquisitely sensitive to external insults such as environmental contaminants.

Picture of Rishi Manchanda

Innovative providers understand health is more than a chemical equation that can be balanced with pills and procedures. They see that health begins in our everyday lives, in the places where we live, work, eat, and play.

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Investigators at the University of Pennsylvania are studying what is takes to get a good night's sleep in Philadelphia.

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A leading tobacco control expert examines a new legal ruling requiring tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived the public for decades.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Are many journalists so attuned to the study of lifestyle factors fueling the rise of cancer, heart disease and diabetes that infectious disease flew under the radar?

Picture of Kate Long

More than one in four West Virginia fifth-graders are now obese. One in four already has high blood pressure. What's their future going to be?

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The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the bulk of the Affordable Care Act last week was a victory for many people currently unable to access care. But one group was excluded from the innovations and improvement of access to care. Undocumented immigrants make up 11 million of U.S. residents.

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