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GSK admits to major fraud, risks in early births, Obamacare quietly working away and a strike against low-carb diets in our Daily Briefing.

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Innovative health reforms in Oregon, new recommendations on hormones for women, an intensive treatement for hypertension, the spread of Chagas disease and more from our Daily Briefing.

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There was a time when menopausal hormone therapy was seen as a near-panacea for the ills of the aging woman. That was before Marcia Stefanick and her Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) colleagues put the theory to the test and upended the medical world.

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West Virginia is among the top five on just about every national chronic disease list. The state leads the nation in diabetes and obesity, according to the Gallup Healthways poll.

Surveys show that many West Virginians do not realize obesity is a leading cause of many chronic diseases. Many also feel those diseases are hereditary, and there is nothing a person can do to prevent them.

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In an era of “modern” medicine, it sometimes seems as if many of the biggies have been knocked out compared to centuries past. The previously untreatable has become treatable and in many cases preventable. With knowledge can come lower societal costs as well as health care cost containment.

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Surrogate markers may not tell the whole story - and we explain why in our latest entry to our online toolkit.

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West Virginia has the nation's worst statistics in 10 of 12 categories in the new 2011 Gallup Healthways ranking. More than one in three West Virginians -- 35.3 percent -- are now obese.

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IUDs are safer than doctors think, autism diagnosis up, cancer diagnosis down, speculating on health reform and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Why the Mediterranean diet keeps hearts healthy, a better way to predict heart attacks, and good news about tuberculosis, plus more from our Top 5 Today.

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There aren’t enough therapists in the world to help the hundreds of millions of people who suffer complex trauma. But one former pastor is tackling the topic in his own community.

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