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heart disease

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From the Jonas Brothers to Antonio Banderas, celebrities are cutting deals with Big Pharma. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Angelo Solis, a homeless alcoholic, racked up nearly $1 million in medical charges over three years. His case represents the immense health care costs associated with homelessness. Sarah Arnquist offers advice on how to report on this important topic.

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In Del Norte County, groups such as the Children's Health Collaborative seek funding in a push to provide more nutritious meals at high schools and encourage students to make healthier food decisions.

 

 

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Could a new Cochrane review slow the trend toward prescribing statins for nearly everyone to prevent heart disease? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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When I was selected to be part of The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship program back in June 2010, I had three story ideas I wanted to develop for my fellowship projects. They involved three major health problems affecting the Latino community in the United States: health disparities of Latino women, diabetes and obesity among Mexican immigrants and Latinos affected by HIV/AIDS.
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Several universities throughout California have received sizeable grants for extensive study of stem cells.

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But the only way doctors and patients and their families will get a really accurate handle on prognosis with current therapies is if a huge prospective study is undertaken or at least a national registry that includes tens of thousands of patients seen at many academic centers and those seen in the community by both cardiologists and general practitioners.

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In this showcase of the George Sampson's 30 part, "What's Killing Silicon Valley" series, he explores the leading causes of death in Santa Clara Valley. The series examines issues including heart attack, cancer and stroke and highlights ways to prevent and react to such diseases.

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What are the causes of cancer? What makes us older? If lifestyle choices like smoking cigarettes or drinking cola increase our risk of cancer, what can we do to try reverse or change these decisions? Is it even possible to reverse the damage? How proven are these theories?

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Here’s what we’re reading today:

Whooping Cough: In the wake of California’s worst pertussis epidemic in 60 years, a new state law requires kids aged 12-17 to get vaccinated for the disease before they enter school in 2011, reports Rong-Gong Lin II of the Los Angeles Times.

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