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heroin

Picture of Joe Szydlowski

In far Northern California, which already is besieged by methamphetamine, law enforcement, doctors and community leaders have noticed another drug is snaking its way back into the black market’s customer base: Heroin.

Picture of Evan George

Heroin addiction grabbed the national spotlight recently after famed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died on Super Bowl Sunday. He was almost certainly not alone that day — about 100 Americans die every day from drug overdoses. Can anything be done to stop this?

Picture of Julia Landau

At the center of one of the great medical controversies of our time, the mishmash around pain medication and addiction to prescription drugs has caused alarm in law enforcement and the public.  But the realities of patients who have chronic pain problems, chronic addiction problems, or both, are not

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

More governors to refuse Medicaid expansion under Obamacare; evidence that Medicaid improves health; problems with methadone and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

How many times do you see pain patients who aren’t addicted represented in stories about prescription painkillers? Maia Szalavitz weighs in.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Fixing Medicare without paying for it, health reform's insurance rebates, and controversial distribution of a heroin overdose antidote, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Bill Macfadyen

In the past, the study of addiction has often been focused on substances — like heroin, marijuana and alcohol. But experts in the field now believe that addiction begins with the “reward circuitry” in the brain rather than the substances themselves.

Picture of William Heisel

Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Do you want to better report on drug addiction and treatment? Avoid having Slate’s Jack Shafer feature your work in his Stupid Drug Story of the Week feature? Then follow these 15 tips from veteran journalist Maia Szalavitz.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug abuse is growing nationwide, but West Virginia was one of the first places hit by the problem. When I picked this topic, I didn't realize how complex it was. The drugs are widely available. Doctors are struggling to treat pain with effective medications without supplying drug abusers. And prescription drug crimes have proven difficult to prosecute.

This is the third in a four-part series examining prescription drug abuse in West Virginia.

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