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Hispanics

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How will the Republicans’ pledge to repeal and replace the ACA change the plight of Latinos who already struggle to afford and access health care?
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
Rufino Jiménez is a legal U.S. resident who pays $17 a month for health insurance he receives through his employer. But he does not have time to go see a doctor — he doesn't even have time to stop and eat his lunch. His struggles are far from unique.
Picture of Richard Bammer

This story is the first in a several-part series about academic and health outcomes for students enrolled in state Migrant Education programs in eastern Solano County, a project funded in part by the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Picture of Norma  Rubio

In the end, distilling the plethora of research and expert quotes from around the country became a less daunting task when I realized that the power of each story from families who face the challenges of autism every single day, really does speak for itself.

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

About one in four Texans lack health coverage, including one in three Hispanics in the state. If a significant portion of the 6.1 million uninsured here don’t or can’t enroll, national targets could be missed, the new health insurance exchanges could falter and insurance rates could spike.

Picture of Norma  Rubio

Rita Meza's daughter Samantha shows that autistic students can connect with work and college opportunities. Meza’s message to parents is, “Don’t give up.”

Picture of Norma  Rubio

Autism, a condition once considered rare, now afflicts an estimated 1 in 88 children in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). And while autism is more common among white children, the largest increases in diagnoses over time have been among Hispanic children.

Picture of Magaly  Olivero

The plight of Hispanic teens at risk of becoming young parents illustrates how social determinants – poverty, employment, educational attainment, housing, the environment and safety – affect community health.

Picture of Magaly  Olivero

Multi-million dollar initiatives to help at-risk and parenting teens across Connecticut call for “evidence-based” and “culturally appropriate” approaches – the mantra of experts assisting Hispanic youth, who have the highest number of teen births in the state.

Picture of Magaly  Olivero

Yanisha Claudio, 15, of Hartford, tenderly swaddled three-week-old Jordan, hoping he wouldn’t wake up. “He was crying until four o’clock in the morning,” said the weary Bulkeley High School freshman.

Announcements

The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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