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HIV prevention

Picture of Larry Buhl
Pre-exposure prophylaxis can save lives, but patients seeking the medications face numerous obstacles.
Picture of Larry Buhl
Social and bureaucratic hurdles have caused unnecessary delays in obtaining what can be a lifesaving antiretroviral medication.
Picture of Larry Buhl
Only a small percentage of Americans who could benefit from the PrEP pill are using it, despite its effectiveness.
Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

In an effort to reduce HIV rates in the state, Governor Brown signed into law a bill that requires those who receive an HIV test with negative results are informed about prevention options like PrEP, the one-a-day pill that's up to 99% effective in preventing HIV.

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

San Francisco’s success with early treatment and access to preventive drugs seems to have made a dramatic impact. That raises the question: Can efforts that work among white gay men also work for Fresno’s undocumented immigrants or injection drug users?

Picture of James  Kityo

Persons living with HIV gathered in Uganda to discuss a number of issues, including antiretroviral drug adherence, influence of traditional practices, human rights and jobs.

Picture of James  Kityo

Ahead of the third International Conference on Family Planning to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from Nov. 12–15, 2013, people living with HIV in Luwero Uganda have called for all major interventions on family planning while incorporating the concerns of persons living with HIV.

Picture of James  Kityo

Among the Bamasaba (also known as the Gishu) of Mbale and Mount Elgon region in Eastern Uganda, every leap year is a traditional circumcision year. To them, male circumcision is a cultural rite for initiation into manhood.

Picture of Katja Heinemann

By 2015 more than half of all people living with HIV in the US will be over 50.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Food additives and obesity, community clinic woes, autism in siblings and more from our Daily Briefing.

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