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Picture of Debra Krol
A collaborative effort between Phoenix-area nonprofit social service agencies is trying out new ways of supporting the estimated 90,000 Native Americans and Alaska Natives who live in the Phoenix metro area.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
After the state expanded Medicaid under the ACA, Washington state health officials noticed that people who were focused on survival were letting their health needs fall by the wayside.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“I do think you should take the arguments in favor of work requirements seriously,” Vox's Dylan Scott advised. “But also, of course, look at them with a skeptical eye.”
Picture of Joseph  Geha
This story was produced by Joseph Geha as part of his participation in the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Monya De

Why is mental health so walled off from the rest of the health care system, even when statistics show that 18 percent of all adults have some kind of mental illness? And weren't federal parity requirements supposed to fix this?

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Tracking domestic violence is difficult; more so in rural areas. But in California’s Del Norte County, these calls come into law enforcement agencies at a rate two-and-a-half times that of anywhere else in the state.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Among Ventura County’s chronically homeless, 37 percent reported a mental illness in the 2015 count. Some officials believe the real percentage is likely higher because the annual survey relies on homeless people self-reporting mental illness, and some may not realize it or don’t want to admit it.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Beaches, sunshine, natural beauty, high-priced homes. In so many ways, Ventura County embodies the affluent, laid-back lifestyle of California’s coastal regions....

Picture of Marc Lester

Every day, outreach workers try to lift homeless alcoholics from the streets of Anchorage, Alaska. In the past, a sober life has always been the goal. But a controversial approach called Housing First is challenging that thinking. Last story in a four-part series.

Picture of Marc Lester

Being homeless isn't easy anywhere, but especially not in Anchorage, Alaska, where hundreds subsist at the confluence of chronic homelessness and addiction. These individuals are the most prolific consumers of public services, gripped by a lifestyle of compounding health problems and risk of death.

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