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homelessness

Picture of Ginny Monk
Carmen Diaz remembers what it was like to be forced out of her home — to be a 13- or 14-year-old who had to pack up her room and stay at a family friend’s house, unsure of where her family would go next.
Picture of Ginny Monk
When Elizabeth Rodriguez tells her 8-year-old son that she doesn’t have any of his baby pictures, not even one or two, she starts to break down.
Picture of Ginny Monk
Educational and child care disruptions because of housing instability are growing increasingly common. The disruptions can have immediate and long-term impacts on kids’ mental health, academic success and social lives.
Picture of Ginny Monk
Since early pandemic-era protections against eviction expired, the number of filings in Connecticut has spiked as rents rise, inflation impacts budgets and families continue to struggle financially.
Picture of Ginny Monk
This project was produced as project for the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2022 National Fellowship and its Kristy Hammam Fund for Health Journalism....
Picture of Ginny Monk
This project was produced as project for the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2022 National Fellowship and its Kristy Hammam Fund for Health Journalism....
Picture of Ginny Monk
This project was produced as project for the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2022 National Fellowship and its Kristy Hammam Fund for Health Journalism....
Picture of Ginny Monk
This project was produced as project for the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2022 National Fellowship and its Kristy Hammam Fund for Health Journalism.
Picture of Kristen Hwang
Once considered an infection nearly eradicated, congenital syphilis rates have risen dramatically in California. Community health workers fan out across communities to find and treat patients who are often homeless or battling addiction.
Picture of Marisa Kendall
Stories from the Bay Area’s tiny homes full of hope, disappointment.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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