Skip to main content.

homelessness

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

If you are sent to live on the streets, it is for most people the same as being sent, without a mouth guard or helmet, into a boxing ring. A ring where the gong never sounds and there's no rope to mark the place where someone could take a swing and blow out your eye socket.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

“An important idea is getting its test run in America: the creation of intensive outpatient care to target hot spots and thereby reduce over-all health care costs.”

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

With no money, a right leg amputated at the knee (due to an infection), no prosthesis, and living completely dependent on a wheelchair that has, at times, been stolen, and a brother to push him over our city’s hills and curbs, it’s quite a trek for Ken to make it to a location where’s there’s a food possibility.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

Angelo Solis, a homeless alcoholic, racked up nearly $1 million in medical charges over three years. His case represents the immense health care costs associated with homelessness. Sarah Arnquist offers advice on how to report on this important topic.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

You might think that spending ten years on the street, two of them at 6th and Mission, might mean that a person is a hopeless case. If you're thinking that way, even secretly in your mind, as you pass people huddled under urine-soaked gray-felted blankets, then now's the time for you to meet

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

This is one in a series of articles, running between Thanksgiving and January, examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco. Check out the previous articles in the series, 

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

This is one in a series of articles, running between Thanksgiving and January, examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco. Check out the previous articles in the series, Looking for deathGunpowder on the streets, and Will losing your home kill you?Hidden in plain sight: dying and homelessness, and Be selfish: Give a gift to a homeless person and The Tenderloin: substance abuse and NateStarving in the Financial District: Ken and food insecurity, and The Sixth and Mission Death Corridor: Assaults, brain trauma and homicide.

If you're like me, you probably like to tell yourself that we don't actually need to read Oliver Twist to know that it's bad for children to grow up on the street. Especially since Dickens discreetly omitted the worst sexual predations that can happen to a child behind a dumpster. As a developed society, we're way beyond needing to revisit that lesson, right?

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

If you are sent to live on the streets, it is for most people the same as being sent, without a mouth guard or helmet, into a boxing ring. A ring where the gong never sounds and there's no rope to mark the place where someone could take a swing and blow out your eye socket.

Doesn't matte

Picture of Linnie Frank Bailey

Health care, education, politics, and pride take a back seat when you have no shelter.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Ken sleeps under a sheltered overhang in the Financial District, an area full of sun-glinting towers and chic lunchtime hot-spots. Our own map of the Top 100 restaurants shows a hefty number clustered there,

Pages

Announcements

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth