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homicide

Picture of Lakeidra Chavis
Shooting survivors face physical and psychological recovery, often with little to no help. Could reallocating resources bring healing?
Picture of Lakeidra Chavis
For every person killed from gun violence in Chicago, five are shot and survive. Those victims — about 30,000 in the last 10 years — are marked for life, and their road to recovery is often one with little to no resources.
Picture of Molly Sullivan
At first the story of Dajha Richards' death was poised to be another daily about a fatal shooting. But as reporter Molly Sullivan combed through her social media accounts, she found a much deeper story of love and abuse.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
A journalist decided to write letters to 103 young people serving sentences in Florida prisons for murders. Could their stories shed light on what made Duval County Florida's "murder capital"?
Picture of Sonali Kohli
A Los Angeles Times reporter spent a year reporting on the high schools in LA County surrounded by the highest number of homicides. Here's what she learned about reporting on trauma.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
For the dozens of Jacksonville kids who have taken part in a crime that ended a life, many said they weren’t looking to hurt someone; they were looking for something to do, and to maybe make a little money, too.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
The children who end up buried the deepest in the criminal justice system were often victims of extensive trauma before they played a part in killing others.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Prison inmates detail the crippling obstacles faced by many of the Jacksonville, Florida children involved in homicides.
Picture of Denisse Salazar
The effort is bringing together civic leaders, police, educators, community groups and religious leaders. The goals are to curb gang-related crime, help children stay out of gangs, and deal with emotional aftermath of violence.
Picture of Jerome Campbell
While many students seem unaffected by the violence, medical experts say the mere knowledge of killings can cause them to experience their own trauma and lose their sense of safety.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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