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hospice

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A "disappeared" food safety investigation, fines for polluting school buses, new sports medicine advances and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Katelyn Mohrbacher

A reflection story written about Jasper, an unforgettable patient I met when I was a third year medical student on a rural rotation. An intricate tale of Jasper's plight, his family's challenges around his end-of-life care, a personal connection to my father's death, and a discussion on our role as health care providers.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Learn the promises and pitfalls of using hospital safety data in your reporting in this Q&A with Kaiser Health News' Jordan Rau.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

My experience reporting on health care in Oregon has been mostly positive, particularly with regards to transparency. Public information is typically handed over without fuss, officials are reachable and often willing to talk and the state, at least from my experience, has a generally favorable attitude toward the press. When I started my project on patient safety, I figured I would encounter much the same thing. I was wrong.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

Each year thousands of patients are harmed by medical care in Oregon. A Bend woman, Mary Parker, was one.

Picture of William Heisel

Victims of bad physician behavior everywhere are rubbing their eyes in disbelief today after Dr. Conrad Murray's conviction in the death of Michael Jackson. Here are five lessons from the case for regulatory agencies, prosecutors, patient advocates and journalists.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

To identify rates of potentially preventable medical harm, The Dallas Morning News  analyzed nearly 9 million patient-level records from hospitals across Texas.

Picture of Ricki Lewis

"Dignity therapy" is a "novel psychotherapeutic approach" that gives patients with a 6-month life expectancy "an opportunity to reflect on things that matter most to them or that they would most want remembered." In fact, hospice volunteers have been providing dignity therapy for decades.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Bad air on school buses, the benefits of Medicaid, concerns over hospice care and more from our Daily Briefing.

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