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Picture of Kimber Solana

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Picture of William Heisel

The idea of telling health care workers they should not wear their scrubs outside the hospital lit up the social media world this week. Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist who abhors the too-casual practice of scrubs on the street, has hit a nerve.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

We all live in fear of that moment of diagnosis. You know it's bad, and your brain flees, backing away into a deep, silent corner. Only the words incurable and cancer slither into the darkness where your thoughts are hiding. So what happens that night if you're homeless?

Picture of William Heisel

Doctors looking for a business model to help them stay profitable in tough economic times should consider the sure-fire plan cooked up by Reliant Hospice in Columbia, South Carolina.

Picture of Caitlan Carroll

End-of-life care is often the most expensive health care. Many people, when given the option, choose to opt out of experimental therapies and drugs as they approach death, but the current health care system structure incentivizes more care instead of less. So patients' wishes often get left out of the equation.

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