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Republicans say a big reason to vote for them is that they want to "end corporate welfare" by getting the government out of the business of choosing which clean energy technologies to nurture. But by quietly, but repeatedly, pressing to bet taxpayer money on hydrogen fuel cells, they may have elimna

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The journalist who wrote two books about the medicine in House, M.D. weighs in on the popular television show's finale.

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Republicans and their allies are dusting off an old $500 billion deception about Medicare, trying once more to scare seniors into voting their way. How some media are catching on — and supplying much-needed context.

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What makes or keeps us healthy often has nothing to do with what happens in our doctor's office or a hospital. Angila Griffin made this discovery a few months ago when a community health worker stopped by to check on her kids, who have asthma. Jean Figaro came armed with vinegar and baking soda. They're cleaning products, he explained.

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A jaw-dropping paycheck for a California health insurance CEO, niacin plus statins isn't an improvement, Vermont's new single payer bill, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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West Virginia children with autism would have a much easier time getting treatment under legislation passed Thursday by the House of Delegates. 

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Here's a recap of the latest developments on the health reform front, along with some helpful resources and story ideas for your community.

March 21, 2010, 10 p.m. PST

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While reporting for a four-part series on the wide gap in life expectancies and disease rates between people in nearby neighborhoods – due to drastically different conditions and social status – I expected to find that health care reform legislation would do little to address this issue. The reform legislation, after all, is primarily about health care insurance. But I was surprised to find that, for the first time, Congressional legislation contains at least $3.4 billion to focus on improving health disparities.

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The Senate may be taking a temporary break from health reform, but a journalist’s quest for fresh angles on the topic never wanes. (If you’re looking for some ideas, check out my previous tips here.)

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We continue our 5-part series on the high cost of health care in America.

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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