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Illinois

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Journalist Mark Taylor examines how one Gary, Indiana emergency room continues to serve some of the sickest and neediest patients in the region, handling more gunshot, knife wound and violent trauma cases than other area ERs, alongside the chronically ill.

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Tonight the State of the Union Address will be delivered by President Obama. An interesting request has been made of the members of Congress (for both Senators and Assembly Representatives). It is that a member of each opposing party sit next to their opposite - to dare to cross the aisle and par

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Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

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Peggy Girshman, executive editor for online at Kaiser Health News (KHN), is hiring. This week, she pulls back the curtain for Career GPS readers and explains what she is looking for in a job applicant and shares her personal do's and don'ts for journalism résumés.

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Social media, blogs and instantaneous online distribution has revolutionized news. The reach of social media is comparable to mainstream media -- in the billions -- "but that's where the similarities end," said attorney Wendy Heimann-Nunes, who moderated an event in Hollywood today about intellectual property, part of the multi-city virtual conference Social Media Week. On the Internet, content can be moved and shared and copied with ease.

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The annual convention of the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) early in August was filled from top to bottom with practical and career-oriented sessions. For me, one of the most useful was off the official books. By Twitter and email, AAJA Texas chapter president Iris Kuo organized a lunchtime get-together for freelancers in the hotel lobby.

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Jeanne Bouillon nearly bled to death after a gynecological procedure went awry. When she found out that the doctor who had performed the procedure had been sued several times to the tune of more than $700,000, she started fighting in Illinois and in Washington D.C. for better disclosure laws that would allow patients to see a physician’s malpractice and disciplinary history. One piece of legislation she fought for, the Patient Right-to-Know Act, eventually made its way into law in 2005.

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Jeanne Bouillon has a tenacity that most patients lack. When you are sick, you don't feel like fighting. And when you have been injured by a physician, you can feel deeply violated and want to just cover your head and hide.

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When the Illinois State Medical Society was on the verge of persuading the Illinois General Assembly to cap non-economic malpractice damages at $500,000, state Rep. Mary Flowers decided that it might be a good time to ask for a few concessions for patients.

Picture of William Heisel

Even before the Supreme Court of Illinois pulled the rug out from under a patient safety law that allowed consumers to review malpractice histories for doctors, state Rep. Mary Flowers was looking for a way to repair the damage.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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