Skip to main content.

immigrants

Picture of Angela Naso
Angela Maria Naso wrote this story while participating in the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Angela Naso
Luis Nolasco, 25, did not know what the psychological consequences would be when he came from Mexico with his family, illegally, at the age of nine. Then, in his late teens, he noticed he began to feel sad and pessimistic.
Picture of Jacqueline García
A reporter explores what Obamacare has meant for the health of DACA recipients and their undocumented family members. For many such families, reform has result in a patchwork quilt of eligibility.
Picture of Deepa Bharath
“The word we use for mental illness in Vietnamese is ‘crazy,’” Lanie Tran said. “If you’re a Buddhist, you believe you or your family members did something wrong in a previous birth. If you’re Catholic, you believe God is punishing you for something you did that was mean or wrong.”
Picture of Lucy Guanuna

“We wanted to see the sun because the lights were on inside all the time. They would wake us up all the time, they wouldn’t let us sleep,” said one unaccompanied minor placed in a Texas detention center. “I wanted to cry. I thought, ‘God why am I here. Why did I come?’”

Picture of Richard Bammer

This article, the third in a series on Migrant Education in eastern Solano County, was produced, in part, as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship, a program at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. 

Picture of Richard Bammer

This report was produced as a project for the 2016 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Picture of Peiwen Jing

For the Chinese American community in Los Angeles, language barriers can limit access to needed health care. But that's not the only challenge recent immigrants face, as Peiwin Jing reports in part one of her series.

Picture of Jacqueline García

For many of the young immigrants who applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status, getting health insurance has not been easy. For others, it hasn’t been a priority.

Picture of Peiwen Jing

As a reporter who was born and raised in China, I had a hard time trying to figure out what my health insurance options were when I came to Los Angeles for graduate school. What was Obamacare? What was Covered California? The challenges go beyond language barriers.

Pages

Announcements

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth