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Picture of Leonardo Castaneda

Working with data, it’s often easy to forget that each entry represents a real human being. An opioid abuse epidemic like the one taking place in San Diego isn’t just a statistically significant outlier — it’s a series of individual human tragedies.

Picture of Alexander Smith

One neighborhood in Kansas City, Kansas, is trying to get its citizens to become more physically active. Zumba, anyone?

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Facing a $55-million deficit during the Great Recession, Sacramento County officials made a choice: To save money, they would close their free health clinics to people who entered the country illegally. Six years later, they want to reverse that decision.

Picture of Andrea Castillo

This story is the first in an occasional series about the drought’s effects on health. Andrea Castillo’s reporting was undertaken for the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.

Picture of Diana Aguilera

Most people wouldn’t think of the San Joaquin Valley - California’s agricultural heartland - as a hotbed for sexually transmitted infections. But the agriculturally rich yet impoverished region has a significant and growing HIV/AIDS problem that’s troubling local health officials.

Picture of William Heisel

The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Picture of William Heisel

The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Picture of Jose Luis Buen Abad

Many immigrants in the state of Washington do not have permanent work and find jobs as day laborers, where they have more accidents and hurt themselves more on the job than fellow workers in the same industries.

Picture of Elaine Wong

Whether through the Medi-Cal expansion or Covered California's individual insurance plans, the Affordable Care Act will give the state's immigrant population more options for health care. But questions remain about how readily they will adopt the new options and if they can afford them.

Picture of Liza Gross

As the Affordable Care Act rolls out in 2014, tens of millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to health coverage. But at least 3 million Californians will remain uninsured, including low-income adults and 1 million undocumented residents.

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Join us for a webinar on the crisis for women, the disproportionate burdens on women of color, and the short-and long-term consequences of the mass exodus of women from workforce. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

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