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incarceration

Picture of Merdies Hayes
A life fraught with constant change and uncertainty.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
A life fraught with constant change and uncertainty.
Picture of ChrisAnna Mink
Before, during and after involvement in the juvenile justice system, the health of these youth is compromised.
Picture of Emily Bader
Nikole Powell’s father developed an opioid use disorder after a work injury, a dependence that traumatized his family and eventually led to his incarceration and death. His daughter is trying to break the cycle.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A survey of Californians sheds new light on how the pandemic is shifting attitudes.
Picture of Cassie M. Chew
Four hours after a federal judge ordered his immediate release from custody, on a Tuesday afternoon in April, Euka Wadlington said goodbye to prison life.
Picture of James  Causey
In Milwaukee, therapists, social workers and criminal justice reform officials are focusing new attention on the well-being of those who suffer traumatic experiences as children. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for Health
Picture of Tessa Duvall
This article and others forthcoming on this topic are being produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism....
Picture of James  Causey
The community garden at the center of Andre Lee Ellis' "We Got This" mentoring program is one of dozens in Milwaukee. Many could use help — from raising money to sweat equity. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for Healt

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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