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incarceration

Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The juvenile justice employees who enforce rules, dole out discipline, offer guidance, and help decide how long teenagers must remain locked up are the foundation of the youth correctional system. Some have criminal records little better than the youths they supervise.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The allegations were straight out of Oliver Twist: Teens said there were maggots in the food — and barely enough of it. Officers choked and punched them. For discipline and diversion, workers organized fights among the detainees.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
As women go to jail at staggering rates, Dallas Morning News reporter Cary Aspinwall tapped into her outrage to tell the story of how their children get overlooked.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
A group of reporters visits L.A.’s Homeboy Industries and learns what second chances mean for young survivors of gang life.
Picture of Richard Webster
Hurricane Katrina forced New Orleans' remaining gangs into the Central City neighborhood. With this mass concentration of drug traffickers came a bloody turf war, near-daily shootings and a rising body count.
Picture of Eve Troeh
Many New Orleans children come from tough backgrounds and have been thrust into a new school system that’s pushing hard to fast-track achievement.
Picture of Julie Small
Two reporters set out to answer a question: Was the horrific death of a mentally ill inmate in a California jail an anomaly or evidence of systemic deficiencies that could lead to more deaths?
Picture of Cary Aspinwall

Oklahoma's Tulsa County has essentially recreated a system of debtors’ prisons, critics say. Less noted, however, is what happens to the children when parents are locked up in county jail, whether for a few days or several months.

Picture of Lottie Joiner

Research by Princeton University sociology professor Sara McLanahan notes that a father’s absence increases anti-social behavior such as drug use and reduces a child’s chances of employment.

Picture of Georges Benjamin

Decades ago we made our criminal justice policies tougher, but in a way that turned out to be neither just nor equitable. As the prison population has soared, we've come to realize our justice system is also terrible for your health. And the forces driving lockups and bad health are often the same.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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