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incarceration

Picture of Cary Aspinwall
As women go to jail at staggering rates, Dallas Morning News reporter Cary Aspinwall tapped into her outrage to tell the story of how their children get overlooked.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
A group of reporters visits L.A.’s Homeboy Industries and learns what second chances mean for young survivors of gang life.
Picture of Richard Webster
Hurricane Katrina forced New Orleans' remaining gangs into the Central City neighborhood. With this mass concentration of drug traffickers came a bloody turf war, near-daily shootings and a rising body count.
Picture of Eve Troeh
Many New Orleans children come from tough backgrounds and have been thrust into a new school system that’s pushing hard to fast-track achievement.
Picture of Julie Small
Two reporters set out to answer a question: Was the horrific death of a mentally ill inmate in a California jail an anomaly or evidence of systemic deficiencies that could lead to more deaths?
Picture of Cary Aspinwall

Oklahoma's Tulsa County has essentially recreated a system of debtors’ prisons, critics say. Less noted, however, is what happens to the children when parents are locked up in county jail, whether for a few days or several months.

Picture of Lottie Joiner

Research by Princeton University sociology professor Sara McLanahan notes that a father’s absence increases anti-social behavior such as drug use and reduces a child’s chances of employment.

Picture of Georges Benjamin

Decades ago we made our criminal justice policies tougher, but in a way that turned out to be neither just nor equitable. As the prison population has soared, we've come to realize our justice system is also terrible for your health. And the forces driving lockups and bad health are often the same.

Picture of Kyle Harvey

How many mental health patients receive the care that they need? Not enough, say Tulare County health officials.

Picture of Emily DePrang

Inside the the Harris County Jail is an award-winning Mental Health Unit that functions as a full psychiatric hospital for up to 250 inmates. Outside the jail, Houstonians with mental illness often can’t find those kinds of services.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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