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Indiana

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This story is Part 7 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

Every dollar invested in a community health center yields returns beyond that investment, said an official of the association representing such centers in Indiana.

“Not only do we provide care to people without access to health services, but we improve the economy,” said Phil Morphew, chief executive officer of the Indiana Primary Care Association.

 

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This story is Part 6 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

In the next three years Methodist Hospitals Northlake in Gary faces perhaps the greatest challenge of its 101-year history.

Health care reform is expected to reduce the rolls of uninsured Gary patients and expand health care access to thousands. But by 2014 the city’s only acute care hospital must figure out how to replace millions of dollars in government funding scheduled to disappear.

 

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This story is Part 3 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

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This story is Part 2 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Construction of a new teaching hospital in Gary may sound like a pipe dream. But it’s a pipe many area health and political leaders are still smoking.

The conversation begins like this: Wouldn’t it be wonderful if Methodist Hospitals and some unknown partners would build a replacement hospital in Gary close to the Indiana University Medical School-Northwest Campus near Interstate 94?

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Journalist Mark Taylor examines how one Gary, Indiana emergency room continues to serve some of the sickest and neediest patients in the region, handling more gunshot, knife wound and violent trauma cases than other area ERs, alongside the chronically ill.

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This story is Part 1 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

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Lung cancer kills more than 4,000 people in Indiana each year. A special report by staff writer Piet Levy examines the causes for so many deaths and what the state is trying to do to reduce the numbers. He also chronicles the struggles of four lung cancer victims as they fight to beat the disease.
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Wikipedia has no entry for the term “drug mill.”

Antidote offers the following: A physician’s office where people suffering from injuries or chronic diseases are given high doses of addictive drugs to keep them returning for more and where people already addicted to painkillers can obtain drugs with no questions asked.

Exhibit A is the Bloomington, Indiana office of Dr. Larry Dean Ratts.

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Dr. Phillip D. Foley of Middletown, Ind., might have a second career as an inspector for the Occupational Safety & Health Administration.

This incredible human being was able to write an average of one prescription per minute without hurting his wrist.

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This weekend was the second session of the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship conferences in Los Angeles, and the event provided some fascinating and newsy morsels. Here's a round-up of what some of the speakers had to say (Check out more detailed blog items here as well.).

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