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Infant mortality

Picture of Lynn Bonner
Black babies in Wake County are six times more likely to die before they reach their first birthday than white babies.
Picture of Alejandra Molina
Five practical takeaways from reporting on how communities are tackling persistent disparities in infant mortality, in the midst of newsroom downsizing and shifting beats.
Picture of Lynn Bonner
North Carolina's high infant mortality rate has been the topic of official state reports and politicians' denunciations since I've been a reporter here — more than 20 years.
Picture of Alejandra Molina
The free state-funded service explores how racism can contribute to the early death of black babies.
Picture of Giles Bruce
It's a high-stakes problem lawmakers across the country are increasingly trying to address.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
This article was produced as a project for the 2017 California Data Fellowship, a program of the USC Center for Health Journalism. 
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in the series include:   Black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. My family is part of this statistic   America's black babies are pay
Picture of Priska Neely
The Castlemont neighborhood in East Oakland is known as a Best Babies Zone. The idea of this initiative is that improving life for everyone in the community will ultimately save babies.
Picture of Priska Neely
It's one thing to identify the complex social cause of this crisis. It's far harder to combat racism and stop more babies from dying.
Picture of Priska Neely
This project received support from the Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship and its Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being....

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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