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The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Fast food and food stamps, cutbacks in worker safety programs, Jerry's Kids loses Jerry and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

Health experts still debate whether wearing hospital scrubs outside the hospital can increase patients' infection risk. Could an Ottawa hospital be the perfect site to investigate that question?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A massive U.S. study of children's health gets underwway, cockroaches and asthma, ambulance diversions and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Sunita Sohrabji

The increase in HIV infections has risen alarmingly among Asian American women, and will soon surpass the rate of infections in high-risk populations unless intervening measures are taken, noted a panel of experts in San Francisco on May 17.

Picture of William Heisel

After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

Picture of Anna Clark

An American nonprofit is offering HIV-positive Kenyan women $40 to use IUDs as long-term birth control—and women are taking them up on it. Is this the right way to prevent the transmission of HIV to children?

Picture of William Heisel

Empowering patients has been a health care mantra for at least a decade. But patients can only do so much to protect themselves from harm, especially when it comes to hospital-acquired infections.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. David C. Martin may be onto something. In three Antidote posts last week, he made the case that health care workers should not wear surgical scrubs out in public. If seen doing so, they should be confronted. Now, doctors are talking back. 

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