Skip to main content.

infection

Picture of William Heisel

On Monday, Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist, introduced the idea that the public should be on the watch for health care workers wearing hospital scrubs outside of a medical setting, especially in restaurants. Martin's plea for a public health response continues.

Picture of William Heisel

You probably have been to a restaurant near a hospital and seen a doctor, nurse or medical assistant wearing scrubs and standing in line for a sandwich. You probably didn’t give this a second thought, but Dr. David C. Martin thinks you should be alarmed.

Picture of Mary Otto

The Deamonte Driver Dental Project was real. It was here. Yet the job of bringing adequate dental care to the poor children of Prince George's County would not be a simple one. State and national public-health officials have been grappling with the same challenges: to educate both poor people and dentists; to address the historic breach between oral health care and the rest of health care; to confront the vast gaps in the dental public-health system.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Radiation Worries: As if you didn’t have enough to worry about with all the controversy over whole-body airport security scanners, the New York Times’ Walt Bogdanich and Jo Craven McGinty examine possible radiation risks for children and teens in the wake of lucrative dental diagnostic technologies both old and new.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Last May was a big month for the Asian community. It was Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, but was also the National Hepatitis B Awareness Month.

The prevalence of hepatitis B among Asians Americans is stunningly high—15% compared to 0.5% for average Americans. So there were many educational workshops and screenings offered by various organizations and institutions in the community through the month.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A new CDC report offers state-by-state stats on hospital infections – but you have to read between the lines for the real story.  

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A quick heads up on some health data now available from the U.S. Department Veterans Affairs, pulled from the innards of a just released (and lengthy)  "open government" report. This should be of interest to journalists who have a V.A. medical facility in their community. (Here's a list of V.A. medical facilities in the United States.)

From the report:

Picture of William Heisel

Here's something a doctor should hope to never hear after performing surgery:

"Doc, my eye feels like mayonnaise."

That was the assessment of an 81-year-old patient operated on by Dr. Gary W. Hall, a Phoenix ophthalmologist.

The patient had cataracts in both eyes, but her vis

Picture of Sarah Kramer

One out of four New Yorkers doesn't speak or understand complex sentences in English. But at some point in their lives, every one of them will need to see a doctor. Language barriers can result in misdiagnoses, medication errors, and potentially fatal mistakes that are costly for both patients and providers. For this reason, hospitals in New York are required to provide "meaningful language access" to all patients. But in a city where more than 140 different languages are spoken, this is no easy task.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

My Dennis Hunt grant story, No Racial Boundary for HIV, was published in Sing Tao Daily on the World AIDS Day in 2009. It was the only feature story published in any publications in New York, if not in the nation, that focused on the AIDS/HIV issue in the Asian community.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth