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NFL receiver Josh Cribbs recently had his brain analyzed and was told his brain resembled that of a 52-year-old. He's only 32 years old. In Cleveland, Cribbs told reporters he worries what his future will look like.

Picture of Neda Iranpour

Navy Corpsman 2nd class Jennifer Starks says yoga helped her reintegrate back into the community because she was isolating herself. Starks was diagnosed with PTSD after 12 years in the military, a career that included two deployments and time on a carrier.

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The consensus view seems to be that forceps should continue to be part of the medical toolkit. But there are a lot of “ifs” to that statement.

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As 18- to 25-year-olds try to find their footing, they face the least access to health care, have the highest uninsured rate, and struggle with greater behavioral and non-behavioral health risks than either adolescents aged 12-17 or young adults aged 26-34.

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Violence-prevention program, Camden GPS Program, helps the city's assault victims.

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Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of William Heisel

Should a doctor be able to say sorry to a patient who has been harmed and then avoid the repercussions of the error?

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Regenerative Sciences, a medical company that pioneered a procedure to treat orthopedic injuries using patients’ own stem cells, is fighting the Food and Drug Administration tooth and nail over a claim that human cells should be federally regulated as drugs, in a landmark case that has far-reaching implications for the future of regenerative medicine.

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