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This story is Part 3 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

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This is one in a series of articles examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco. Check out the previous articles in the series, Looking for death,Gunpowder on the streets, and Will losing your home kill you?

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Many years ago I was a kid on a wilderness canoe trip, on a beautiful isolated lake in northern Ontario. We stopped for lunch in the early afternoon and stripped down to wash up in the cold water.

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Rebecca Morley is the executive director of the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH),where she leads a multi‐disciplinary staff in creating healthy and safe housing for children. Ms.Morley spearheaded NCHH’s work in the Gulf Coast region following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. She has authored numerous articles and publications on housing‐related health hazards. Before joining NCHH in 2002, Ms. Morley was a senior associate with ICF Consulting in Washington, D.C., where she advised clients, including federal agencies, on the development of lead poisoning prevention. Ms.

Picture of Jessica Ogilvie

For journalists, the topic of health care disparities — particularly in Los Angeles — is a familiar concept. Exploring the discrepencies in care between various socioeconimic and ethnic groups often leads down a road of dismal statistics and frustrating realities. 

But what happens if we refocus our gaze away from the patients and onto the providers?

Picture of Zoe Corneli

In California alone, nearly 4 million working people lack health insurance. Many of them are young, educated professionals who freelance or work part time. These are the invisible uninsured, our neighbors and friends. Often, lacking health care is their uncomfortable secret.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll hear some of the stories of this group. Today, KALW’s Zoe Corneli reports on educated young adults who make the choice to live without health insurance.

Picture of Walter Melton

This story is about the angst and frustration experienced while not having health insurance followed by the serenity experienced after completing a surgical procedure because I was covered with medical insurance

Picture of Casey Selix

This story attempts to bust through the stereotypes about uninsured people in Minnesota, which has one of the lowest uninsured rates in the nation.

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Larry Cohen is executive director and founder of the Oakland-based Prevention Institute. He has been an advocate for public health and prevention since 1972. He was the founding director of the Contra Costa County Prevention Program, where he formed the first coalition in the nation to change tobacco policy. The coalition passed local anti-smoking ordinances and served as a catalyst for other statewide and national efforts, including smoking bans on airplanes and restrictions in public places, restaurants, and workplaces.

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Kathryn Flores is the director of the San Benito County Health and Human Services Agency. The agency protects and promotes the health, safety and environment of San Benito County residents by preventing and controlling disease, environmental hazards, injury and disability, and by educating and promoting healthy lifestyles. The staff is multicultural and many are bilingual.

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