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Institute of Medicine

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In Del Norte County, groups such as the Children's Health Collaborative seek funding in a push to provide more nutritious meals at high schools and encourage students to make healthier food decisions.

 

 

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Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Lead: The investigative news startup California Watch, not content to merely report on harmful lead levels in children’s jewelry, will actually test suspect items for you.

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Antronette K. Yancey is a professor in the Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, and is Co‐Director of its Center to Eliminate Health Disparities. Dr.Yancey's primary research interests are in chronic disease prevention and adolescent health promotion. She returned to academia full‐time in 2001 after five years in public health practice, first as Director of Public Health for the city of Richmond, VA, and, until recently, as Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Dr.

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Francine Kaufman became vice president of global affairs for Medtronic Diabetes in January 2009, after 30 years at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, where she was head of the Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, and 11 years as a professor of pediatrics at USC’s Keck School of Medicine. At Childrens Hospital, where she continues a clinical practice, Dr. Kaufman also directed the Comprehensive Childhood Diabetes Center.

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The WIC program, which offers nutrition education and food vouchers to low-income families, will soon get a healthy overhaul. But to cash in, food manufacturers have had to make some adjustments. Rachel Dornhelm reports.

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In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published a seminal report, "To Err is Human," sparking a movement to improve the quality of health care in the United States. The report concluded that at least 44,000 people — and possibly as many as 98,000 — die in hospitals annually from preventable medical errors. In the last decade, patient safety advocates and governments have promoted increased transparency about hospital infection rates and overall safety performance.

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Before describing a few stories that have not received much play in the media, I'd like to mention a few publications by my Urban Institute colleagues that provide useful state and local information. One report shows, by Congressional district, the proportion of residents with various types of health coverage (uninsured, privately insured, or covered by Medicaid or other public programs).

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A new Institute of Medicine report offers some excellent fodder for stories on "comparative effectiveness research," which examines whether and why some medical treatments are more effective than others.

You'll be hearing a lot about the comparative effectiveness buzzword as the national health reform debate unfolds, because it's seen as crucial in in lowering health costs. Why spend money on drug-eluting stents for heart disease, for example, if plain old stents might just keep people alive longer?

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Yolanda Partida brings 25 years of experience in public and private health administration as national program director for Hablamos Juntos, an initiative that examines language barriers to health care for Latinos. She has worked with and on behalf of many different groups of underserved populations, including the uninsured, the U.S.-Mexico border population, and other ethnic communities.

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More than 100 anti-transgender rights bills were introduced in state legislatures this year. Many focus on children and teens. Join us for our next Health Matters webinar, where we'll explore the health and well-being of transgender youth as states such as Arkansas and Tennessee seek to limit their rights. Our expert panel will share the latest research, seed story ideas and offer reporting advice. Sign-up here!

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The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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