Skip to main content.

insurance

Picture of Leila  Day

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being under-treated and under-diagnosed. KALW's Leila Day talks with local psychiatrist Dr. Loma Flowers about the reasons why many in the black community may still resist therapy.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Facing a $55-million deficit during the Great Recession, Sacramento County officials made a choice: To save money, they would close their free health clinics to people who entered the country illegally. Six years later, they want to reverse that decision.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

For uninsured California immigrants, which side of a county line they live can significantly affect the care available when they're sick. And Obamacare reforms are complicating choices for local officials as they consider what, if any, healthcare should be provided for the remaining uninsured.

Picture of Tracy  Seipel

Some state lawmakers are trying help Californians by expanding the number of Medi-Cal providers following the explosive growth of the state's health plan for the poor under the Affordable Care Act. California's Medicaid program now serves almost a third of the state's population.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

The newly Republican-controlled Congress isn’t wasting time to take sharp aim at President Barack Obama’s health reform law. Here’s a look at the top bills, lawsuits and debates that could mean major changes.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

As hundreds of thousands of residents across the region put new health care benefits to the test, doctors and hospitals are reporting a mixed bag of gains and growing pains.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

In Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, more than 85,600 residents have enrolled into the new Medicaid benefits in the last year. The expansion has been a boon for community health centers and safety net providers that for decades have discounted care or forgone payments from uninsured patients.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

Picture of Kathleen O'Brien

New Jersey's health care safety net for poor families was strained even before the ACA offered states money to expand Medicaid. The rate it pays doctors is among the lowest of any state in the nation. That can make it hard for patients to get the timely care they need.

Pages

Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth