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Picture of William Heisel

Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of William Heisel

Three more questions you should pursue based on the debate over the SorryWorks! program, which protects doctors who apologize for medical errors that harm patients.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Unnecessary angioplasties, friendlier relations between insurers and care providers, hospitals that cater to the patient rather than focusing purely on the disease, and more from our Daily Briefing. 

Picture of Liz Borkowski

If a couple in good health with plenty of resources finds it this challenging to apply for health insurance policies, are lawmakers wise to propose replacing Medicare with vouchers?

Picture of Angilee Shah

Solana discusses his new job at the Medicare NewsGroup and why journalists shouldn't be afraid to chance something new.

Picture of Michael  Douglas, MD, MBA

Going into the second day of oral arguments before the Supreme Court regarding the constitutionality of the reform law, a new round of polling suggests that antipathy toward that buzzphrase — "individual mandate" — comes from a slim majority of the public.

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Kern County, with similar geography and population to Fresno, decided to enter the new health insurance program called Bridge to Reform. On the way, Kern has stumbled upon many challenges, but for some patients, the program has changed their lives.

Picture of Scott Goldberg

For the past twenty years, Shepherd's Clinic in Baltimore has provided comprehensive health care to the uninsured -- without any government funding. Since the recession began in 2008, more and more people are finding themselves walking through the clinic's doors for the first time.

Picture of William Heisel

The controversy over revisions to psychiatry's bible, the DSM, isn't just about autism. Guest blogger Mary Schweitzer throws chronic fatigue syndrome into the mix.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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