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Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Studying the health of people who live near polluted rail yards, a California medical school in jeopardy, health reform court battle and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A health insurer stuns by giving back, heart attacks killing patients younger in California, and salmonella on the rise, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A little legwork can deliver compelling stories about how cancer treatment costs are affecting patients in your community, whether they’re  insured or not. Here are some tips and resources to jump-start your reporting.

Picture of William Heisel

"Octomom" Nadya Suleman went to Dr. Michael Kamrava as a troubled patient. She was treated instead by her physician - who lost his license this week - as a customer. And now the media has chosen to treat her as a criminal.

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Doctors and dentists are trying to restrict their patients' ability to rate them on consumer review sites such as Yelp and Angie’s List or even in personal emails. Here are five reporting tips from a doctors rating investigation by the Ars Technica blog.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Who wants to take care of a patient who is statistically likely to rate you poorly when your payment for services is based on that same rating? Doc Gurley examines the role of race and racism in patient satisfaction ratings.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

How did we get to the point where we actually pay popular doctors more for our health care? No such system exists in any other professional or non-professional field. You can’t even pay your plumber less if she has a lower customer satisfaction score.

Picture of William Heisel

William Heisel interviews Delaware journalist Jonathan Starkey about how he uncovered life-threatening denials of diagnostic tests by an insurer.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

Some local entrepreneurs have been stunned because they failed to meet all the rules for the small-business tax credits in last year's highly vaunted federal health care law to help cover their health care costs.

Despite their disappointment, they're hopeful that another part of the law, which kicks in three years from now, is well worth waiting for.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

Journalist Yesenia Amaro examines how some small businesses will cope with health reform as their health costs for workers continue to soar.

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Our California Impact Fund offers mentorship and support to reporters who think big and want to make a difference in their communities through investigative or explanatory reporting on promising approaches to chronic ills. 

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