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Jan Gurley

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At a recent public health conference in San Francisco, health advocates warned that the war on tobacco is far from over. Here's the latest from the front lines.

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This year's Health 2.0′s Code-a-thon led to a Twitter app that may prevent suicide, a disaster triage smartphone app and tools for remotely reading medical tests. Read about the 2012 award winners from one of the competition's judges.

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How do you make house calls for the homeless? By going straight to the streets. Tammy Worth examines the specialty of street medicine.

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Once the Great Potassium Iodide panic began, most Americans received messages saying “Don't Panic” on Twitter, on Facebook, the Internet. And that was the responsible media thing to do, right? Here's what may be wrong with that approach, neurologically speaking.

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You might think that spending ten years on the street, two of them at 6th and Mission, might mean that a person is a hopeless case. These four amazing people illustrate homeless success.

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She’d slept one night in the Mission District under a bush, and woke in the dark when someone grabbed her ankle. Four men held her down and raped her. Now, almost three months later, she spoke in a flat, detached voice like this was somehow normal, just another blank to be filled in like her cough, or whether she had an allergy, her eyes drifting all around the room.

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Awareness of the risks to children from not having a stable home also means that parents who are already desperately trying to juggle the demands of managing a life without an address, or a stable food supply, or often a phone, are also frantically trying to do what’s best for their kids, often under mind-blowingly stressful circumstances.

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If you are sent to live on the streets, it is for most people the same as being sent, without a mouth guard or helmet, into a boxing ring. A ring where the gong never sounds and there's no rope to mark the place where someone could take a swing and blow out your eye socket.

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With no money, a right leg amputated at the knee (due to an infection), no prosthesis, and living completely dependent on a wheelchair that has, at times, been stolen, and a brother to push him over our city’s hills and curbs, it’s quite a trek for Ken to make it to a location where’s there’s a food possibility.

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But like many people on the street, Nate can’t seem to physically relax; no matter how safe the environment he is constantly vigilant. He rarely makes eye contact, his smile is fleeting and involuntary and his shoulders stay hunched. And Nate’s story about how he ended up here is also in many ways remarkably similar to many others’.

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