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Picture of Kelley Atherton

Between March and May, I had several moments of panic about whether I was going to be able to complete the last two of the three stories I promised for the fellowship.There's a sense of relief when the editing is done and the designers are putting it on the page and I go home to try and take my mind off the story. That usually doesn't work and I ended up laying in bed worrying about typos, whether names are spelled correctly or huge inaccuracies because I've completely misunderstood the story (that has never happened, but I still worry nonetheless) and that I'm a fraud of a journalist. The real sigh of relief comes the next day when I'm thinking about the next story.

Picture of Laura Newman

After three days of listening to expert neurologists, demographers, caregivers, and policy people on Alzheimer's disease, journalist Laura Newman raises tough questions for journalists to consider to avoid oversimplifying this complicated topic.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Low trace levels of radioactive iodine-131 have been found in rain in Massachusetts. Now, as Doc Gurley r

Picture of William Heisel

William Heisel interviews Michele Simon, public health attorney and author of Appetite for Profit, who wants people to rethink what they are eating and why. She peers through the food industry marketing to see what big packaged food manufacturers and restaurant giants are really selling.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today in the Daily Briefing we're reading about conflicts of interest, Google Health and wars that don't end at home.

Picture of Angilee Shah

A selection from the weekend, long and short reads, and a video in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Once the Great Potassium Iodide panic began, most Americans received messages saying “Don't Panic” on Twitter, on Facebook, the Internet. And that was the responsible media thing to do, right? Here's what may be wrong with that approach, neurologically speaking.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Disease, disaster and video games are highlighted in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Learn more about what killed Elizabeth Taylor and the first anniversary of health reform in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Laurie  Udesky

The nuclear crisis still playing out in Japan may be happening thousands of miles away, but there are numerous relevant stories that health reporters can unearth in the United States that go beyond breaking news.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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