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Journal of the American Medical Association

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Wearing gloves and gowns in health care settings lower infection rates, a new study shows. But, wait. Wearing gloves and gowns doesn’t lower infection rates. That’s from the same study. And hence the media's confusion.

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"The renowned mythbuster of medicine" - as one blog calls John Ioannidis, MD, of Stanford - asks tough, important questions about the 100,000+ medical conferences held each year. Journalists and the public should learn from his warnings - since so much news is reported from these meetings.

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Despite those unhealthy calories, some fast food restaurants offer something rare in urban communities -- a clean and convenient place to hang out.

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It's all hospitals and doctors in today's Daily Briefing:

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Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association, made some bold statements at last week’s Association of Health Care Journalists conference in Chicago.

“I usually talk about conflict of interest wearing a flak jacket,” DeAngelis said and proceeded to list all the ways she has gotten tough on authors with ties to the drug or device industries.

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Dr. Murray B. Stein is a professor of psychiatry and family and preventive medicine at UCSD and director of the Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program at UCSD and at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. His research interests include the neurobiology, epidemiology and treatment of anxiety disorders including social phobia, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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