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Kentucky

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Notions of personal failure and our collective ignorance of what it’s like to live on $8.60 a day help explain why 20 states have not covered the very poorest, and why Medicaid as we know it could disappear.

Picture of Ryan White

On Monday, Montana became the 30th state to expand Medicaid. On Tuesday, election results cast Kentucky's Medicaid expansion into doubt. What does this all have to do with kids' health? When it comes to children's health insurance, a state's Medicaid status can make a big difference.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

Picture of Erica Peterson

To document Rubbertown, Ky., residents’ claims of unusually high rates of disease, I needed hard data. Originally, I had planned a health survey of the areas around the industrial plants. When that proved impractical, I enlisted a state health monitoring agency.

Picture of William Heisel

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 36 states have operational Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs that look for patients who are trying to feed an addiction. Only a handful track doctors who are prescribing outside the norm.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, NARA, offers inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and a 70-bed residential program in Portland, Oregon.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Research from across the nation shows that treating drug addiction reduces crime and medical expenses while boosting employment, meaning every dollar spent on treatment actually saves an average of $7.

Picture of Laura Ungar

This organization receives more than 40,000 calls a year to its crisis lines, which guide addicts through those dark moments by connecting them with the treatment they need.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Michael Donta, 24, tried to seek help for his prescription drug addiction but was never successful and he eventually took his own life in 2010.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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