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Kentucky

Picture of Laura Ungar

It was a sprint to the finish, but we got the first installment of my fellowship project -- a package on the growing crisis of addicted babies -- into the paper on Sunday....

Picture of Kate Long

Three years ago, when West Virginia was leading the nation in diabetes, the American Diabetes Association shut down its West Virginia office.

Now, officials have decided to bring the organization back to West Virginia.
Picture of Kate Long

Think about this: More than 200,000 West Virginians have contracted a disease that kills people. About 69,000 of them don't know they have it.

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West Virginia has the nation's worst statistics in 10 of 12 categories in the new 2011 Gallup Healthways ranking. More than one in three West Virginians -- 35.3 percent -- are now obese.

Picture of William Heisel

Why do people in Montana know more about their cows than their healthcare-acquired infections like MRSA? And what does that mean for patient safety?

Picture of Angilee Shah

My first panel at SXSW wasn't a whiz-bang-gadget conversation, but one that spurred great thinking on communities that don't necessarily have access to high-speed broadband Internet.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Patricia Green went to prison in 2009, which she says saved her life from her drug addiction. Now she is helping younger girls who, like her, need the support of others to move forward with their lives.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Lori McComas Chaffins spent a decade battling an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs before she decided to change her life.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

How did human penises evolve without spikes? Stanford researchers suggest one explanation, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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