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Kentucky

Picture of Kate Long

Three years ago, when West Virginia was leading the nation in diabetes, the American Diabetes Association shut down its West Virginia office.

Now, officials have decided to bring the organization back to West Virginia.
Picture of Kate Long

Think about this: More than 200,000 West Virginians have contracted a disease that kills people. About 69,000 of them don't know they have it.

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West Virginia has the nation's worst statistics in 10 of 12 categories in the new 2011 Gallup Healthways ranking. More than one in three West Virginians -- 35.3 percent -- are now obese.

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Why do people in Montana know more about their cows than their healthcare-acquired infections like MRSA? And what does that mean for patient safety?

Picture of Angilee Shah

My first panel at SXSW wasn't a whiz-bang-gadget conversation, but one that spurred great thinking on communities that don't necessarily have access to high-speed broadband Internet.

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Patricia Green went to prison in 2009, which she says saved her life from her drug addiction. Now she is helping younger girls who, like her, need the support of others to move forward with their lives.

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Lori McComas Chaffins spent a decade battling an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs before she decided to change her life.

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How did human penises evolve without spikes? Stanford researchers suggest one explanation, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Heather May

Six areas with highest smoking rates also have highest hospitalizations. It is a sidebar to the third part of her series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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