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Though it is clear that South Los Angeles is park poor compared to rest of Los Angeles County, current fiscal problems lend people to dismiss the idea of spending more money creating parks, adding trees or fixing sidewalks. Turns out that maybe Los Angeles can’t afford not to invest in more nature.

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How does a new park in Culver City become a destination, while the urban trail of Stocker Corridor is overlooked by many of its own nearby residents?

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At the first meeting in L.A. we could see that we were not the only ones feeling torn between the desire to do in-depth reporting and the time-consuming demands of marketing that work on social media. However, over time, we came to appreciate how critical it is to reach out to readers via social media, how quickly readers' habits are changing, and how the web is redefining the concept of community.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

The health of South Los Angeles suffers in part because much of this area was designed for the poor. The infrastructure itself plays a role. How did western L.A. County end up having 59 acres of park space per 1,000 people and South L.A. end up with 1.2? Many of the problems we are facing today were built into the very structure of the Los Angeles area. Today's environmental injustice was no accident in the Los Angeles area.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

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By its own admission, Glendale was in desperate need for a new approach to transportation planning. The unintended consequences of a transportation network that emphasized moving cars can be seen in the statistics.

Part 1: Glendale Invests in Safe and Healthy Streets for a Safe and Healthy Future

Part 2: The Embedded Activist

Part 3: Second Steps: The Riverdale-Maple Greenway Will Connect Parks in Glendale

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In the past few years, Long Beach, Calif. has undergone changes to reduce traffic, increase pedestrian safety and promote bicycle use among residents. Damien Newton continues a series on the city's efforts to transform itself into a more livable community.

Picture of Angilee Shah

It might cause a snicker or two from many Angelenos, but last week, I took a tour of the Los Angeles River.

Picture of Damien Newton

Los Angeles County awarded five grants to Southern California cities in 2008 to encourage more effective transportation planning and healthier living.

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The Online Health Journalism fellows convened June 23-25 for their second session at the L.A. Athletic Club in downtown Los Angeles. Topics included online business models, crunching data and use of social media tools to engage readers. Now on to those projects!

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