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Picture of Kelley Atherton

Between March and May, I had several moments of panic about whether I was going to be able to complete the last two of the three stories I promised for the fellowship.There's a sense of relief when the editing is done and the designers are putting it on the page and I go home to try and take my mind off the story. That usually doesn't work and I ended up laying in bed worrying about typos, whether names are spelled correctly or huge inaccuracies because I've completely misunderstood the story (that has never happened, but I still worry nonetheless) and that I'm a fraud of a journalist. The real sigh of relief comes the next day when I'm thinking about the next story.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The long-awaited Federal Communications Commission report on American journalism, Information Needs of Communities, paints a poignant picture of the decline of health journalism at the nation’s newspapers.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

To encourage more doctors to work in underserved areas, state Assemblyman Henry Perea, D-Fresno, proposed a bill for the Steven M. Thompson Medical School Scholarship Program to help students pay for medical school. The bill, Assembly Bill 589, has a condition: The students contractually commit to work their first three years after residency in an underserved area.

Picture of Bill Macfadyen

When gangbangers aren't your biggest worry, you've got real problems

Picture of Michelle Levander

It takes a certain kind of stubbornness and stick-to-it-ness to develop a successful online news site or a popular blog, especially if you are writing about the civic life of your community — not fashion tidbits or celebrity gossip. We are working with these news innovators to expand their health reporting.

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency. Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air affects their health.

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? If you live in L.A. County, and especially if you’ve driven back to the Los Angeles basin from somewhere else, you’ve seen it. A steely brown haze hangs over us for much of the year. We live in the smoggiest region in the United States (according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District), but for those raising children here it may not be top of mind. In some parts of the county, moms claw their way onto waiting lists for the “right” preschool while they are still pregnant. Concerns about finding the right neighborhood, the right school, about keeping kids away from gangs and drugs or getting them to turn off the Xbox and do some homework tend to take center stage. The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency.

Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air impacts their health. 2010 California Health Journalism Fellow Christina Elston reports.

Picture of Christina Elston

Eight weeks without food. Five days without water. Three minutes without air. In the world of survival math, breathing is at the top of almost every equation. But here in the L.A. Basin, we inhale much more than life-sustaining oxygen, drawing in a mix of ozone, carbon

Picture of Ryan ZumMallen

In my first few blogs, I've explained some of the environmental issues facing the city of Long Beach both today and in the long-term. The main point of concern is often pollution caused by operations at the Port of Long Beach. But another concern, perhaps just as dangerous to the community in terms of air pollution, are the nearby railyard facilities where cargo trains move in and out, all day and every day.

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