Skip to main content.

latino

Picture of Jenny Manrique

Despite the need, undocumented Latinos typically face major barriers in accessing mental health care. A reporter asks, What approaches are showing the most promise in reaching this community?

Picture of Angela Naso

Mental illness has been a trending topic in the news. While we often see stories about it, not much attention is given to how the Latino community is faring. A 2016 California Fellow sets out to change that with a series on stigma and mental health needs in Southern California communities.

Picture of Steve Han

My early exposure to drinking alcohol is probably familiar to many Korean Americans, who, starting at a young age, often witness how much alcohol is valued, celebrated and considered a key part of socializing and enjoyment with friends and family.

Picture of Bob  Ortega

You might think that every parent knows enough to make sure their child uses a car seat or is properly belted in whenever they drive somewhere....

Picture of Rubén Tapia

Una mujer decidió por su cuenta convertir su casa en centro de inscripción. Invitó a sus familiares y vecinos, en su mayoría desasegurados, que estaban indecisos sobre si inscribirse o pagar la multa. ¿Podría ser un modelo a replicar para inscribir a más latinos?

Picture of Rubén Tapia

A Mexican-American woman decided to convert her house into a health insurance registration center. She invited her family and neighbors, most of them uninsured. Could this be a model strategy to sign up more Latinos?

Picture of Ted B. Kissell

When Covered California reports its health insurance enrollment figures each month, one worrying statistic consistently jumps out –- the low number of Latinos signing up. This became the top news story out of the exchange in January, overshadowing the overall positive numbers.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

In Latino households, where family is a priority and multiple generations live under one roof, children face unique challenges in providing care for their aging relatives.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

Sixty-seven percent of Hispanic women and seventy-five percent of Latino men in Chicago who work full time, were uninsured in 2009, according to the analysis of today. These figures were much lower than that recorded full-time workers whites, blacks and Asians.

Picture of Michelle Rivas

Tips for connecting with the Latino community through online health blogging and discovering the unique relationship between Latino bloggers, twitter lovers and health consumers.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth