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Latinos

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
There were big gains in access among Filipino Americans, Latinos, and LGBTQ+ residents.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Even when sick, immigrant workers often feel like they have no choice but to show up at the job — they have to work to survive.
Picture of JoAnn Mar
For Asians, Latinos, and other ethnic minorities, the end of life presents unique challenges. Language barriers and cultural traditions can often inhibit access to hospice, pain management, and comfort care.
Picture of Francisco Castro
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Cristina Londono
In reporting on epidemic levels of back pain among immigrant laborers, a Telemundo correspondent finds a community deeply wary of discussing the problem on camera.
Picture of Francisco Castro
Susana Castro’s arms are deformed, bruised and mangled. At 67-year-old native of Mexico City has suffered from diabetes since she was 40. She now requires three hours of dialysis treatment every third day, or else she will die.
Picture of Sandra Cervantes
Not knowing how the Affordable Care Act will be changed and the possibility that Congress and President Trump will repeal it without an adequate replacement has many Latinos worried.
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
It can be hard to find new, compelling ways of telling stories about well-known health issues. But as reporter Elizabeth Aguilera discovered in her series on type 2 diabetes, that shouldn’t stop you.
Picture of Barrett Newkirk
For some Californians living near the border, Mexico offers the promise of reliable health care at a cheaper price. Here's how one journalist reported the story, and the lessons he learned along the way.
Picture of Barrett Newkirk
Thousands of people in California's Coachella Valley head to Mexico every year for health care. Often they seek deals on prescription drugs or dental care. For others, Mexico offers easy access to primary care that is cheap and convenient.

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Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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