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lead poisoning

Picture of Giles Bruce
Here’s how reporters can investigate contamination in their communities.
Picture of Angela Caputo
At the Bunker Hill Superfund site in northern Idaho, a reporter meets the family of a 4-year-old so severely poisoned by lead, he still couldn’t speak.
Picture of Michelle Levander
The Center for Health Journalism has awarded $25,000 in reporting grants from our Impact Fund to help California journalists undertake ambitious explanatory or investigative reporting about health issues in underserved communities in the state.
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigative reporter for Capital & Main shares how data, investigative smarts and stubborn persistence eventually culminated in new state legislation.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Joe Rubin
Joe Rubin is a Sacramento-based investigative reporter and a fellow with USC Annenberg’s Center for Health Journalism. His reporting on workplace exposures to lead in California has appeared in Capital & Main.
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigation into a Sacramento gun range ultimately spurred new legislation to better protect workers from lead poisoning.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
A family with a young child in Los Angeles found dangerous levels of lead in their rental. But they haven't been able to find another home in the region's extremely tight housing market.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Famously troubled East St. Louis is embracing an idea known as “collective impact.” The idea is to better connect residents to existing services.
Picture of Susan  Abram
They analyzed chipped paint in old homes, hunted down landlords, begged families to speak with them, and even got down on their hands and knees to collect contaminated soil.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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