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lead poisoning

Picture of Emmanuel Felton
In East St. Louis, the school district is helping parents get back on their feet.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Locals are the first to acknowledge that pouring more money into the city isn’t the only answer.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
A month after an investigation found dangerous levels of asbestos fibers in some of Philadelphia’s most rundown elementary schools, the school district has begun cleaning up seven of them.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Why would Disneyland be part of an effort to defeat a bill that requires reporting of blood-lead levels high enough to produce heart disease and serious brain disorders?
Picture of Barbara Laker
Many Philadelphia schools are incubators for illness, with environmental hazards that endanger students and hinder learning.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
Picture of Joe Rubin
Are California regulators in denial about the dangers of lead? The state's response to previous lead-poisoning crises raise plenty of doubts.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
While many policymakers still think of concentrated poverty as an issue afflicting the nation’s big urban centers, smaller cities are increasingly home to those Americans with the greatest needs and the least resources. Take East St. Louis, for example.
Picture of Erin Schumaker
“Everyone agrees that housing is an important determinant of health, but that’s very hard to measure because it’s overly correlated with other aspects of poverty,” said Thomas Waters, a housing policy analyst in New York City.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
For an ambitious project on lead in Chicago, City Bureau started with the question: "How do we as journalists meet people where they are?" The answer included a text-message service that responds with lead test data for the user's community.

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