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lead poisoning

Picture of Ryan White
New research on lead's negative effects on IQ and class makes a brutal irony even clearer — lead is a lifelong disaster, particularly for poor children already facing serious disadvantages.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
Data recently made public by Philadelphia's school district showed that nearly 15 percent of water samples taken from school drinking water outlets had lead higher than the legal level for home tap water. This needs to change.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
In the wake of reporting from two National Fellows, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that the city will begin to enforce a four-year-old law that requires landlords to certify that their properties are lead-safe before renting to families with young kids.
Picture of Barbara Laker
This article was produced as a project for the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Other stories in the series include: Philly's shame: City ignores thousands of poisoned kids
Picture of Darryl Holliday
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Children who have been exposed to lead poisoning have access to the Early intervention program that offers resources ranging from speech therapy to nutrition services.
Picture of Barbara Laker
In Philadelphia, thousands of children are newly poisoned by lead year after year — at a far higher rate than those in Flint, Michigan.
Picture of Ryan White

Residents living near the now-shuttered Exide battery recycling center in east Los Angeles fought hard to close the lead-emitting plant. But their struggles continue, as they now turn to a cleanup effort of daunting proportions.

Picture of Barbara Laker

The little girl just wasn’t herself. Her mom, Jacqueline Thomas, knew something was seriously wrong....

Picture of Rachel  Dissell

Despite decades of effort and millions in taxpayer money, Cleveland’s kids continue to have some of the highest rates of lead poisoning in the country. Bad housing and urban blight only compound their stress and suffering.

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