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learning disabilities

Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
As schools have returned to in-person instruction, advocates for children say they’re starting to see an uptick in juvenile justice complaints. We look at how diversion works in other countries.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
Juvenile justice advocates see a disproportionate number of children with reading disabilities. The pandemic shed a light on those inequities.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
School-based juvenile justice complaints decreased when children were not in school during the pandemic, but what about now?
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
When schools shut down at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, juvenile delinquency complaints decreased. Here’s what it means — and what it doesn’t.
Picture of Noe Magana
Over a three-year period, disabled students in San Benito County dropped out at more than twice the rate of the general student population.
Picture of Jocelyn Wiener
Why are so many young children in California not being screened for developmental issues, despite clear guidelines that they should be?
Picture of Darryl Holliday
Children who were poisoned by lead are now suffering the effects as young adults. The question many parents are asking is how will the school system help these students?
Picture of Elizabeth Grossman

The number of children diagnosed with developmental disabilities has increased notably in the past two decades, and a growing body of science suggests that environmental pollution, stress and food insecurity are fueling the trend.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Nearly every day, Arleen Hernandez battles an aging septic tank that backs up into her toilet and shower. Upon moving to Parklawn in 1986, she didn’t realize her new neighborhood lacks basic public services.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s doubtful that so many health journalists would have covered the case of the late Dr. Mel Levine if he had not appeared on Oprah.

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The nation's top infectious disease specialist will join us for a conversation with national health reporter Dan Diamond of The Washington Post. We’ll talk about the evolving threat posed by monkeypox, the current state of the COVID pandemic, and broader lessons on how we respond to emerging diseases. Sign-up here!

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