Skip to main content.

Los Angeles Times

Picture of William Heisel

In January, California will shore up promises it made when launching its innovative prescription drug-tracking program with more funding and a better ability to find patients who doctor shop or physicians who prescribe an abnormal amount of opiates.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Commercially produced US meat contains many controversial ingredients. The chemicals, hormones and additives stem from Big Meat's desire to grow animals faster, squeeze them into smaller living spaces and keep products on store shelves longer.

Picture of Ryan White

Perhaps every journalist dreams of writing a story that changes the world. Fewer dream of writing the story that changes themselves. But it’s that latter story that found Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez, who shared his experience with the 2013 National Health Journalism Fellows.

Picture of Ryan White

Nationwide, about four percent of grandchildren are in the care of their grandparents, a figure that jumps upwards of seven percent in states such as Louisiana and Mississippi.

Picture of William Heisel

Most of the people who contract valley fever live in California or in Arizona. But concerns about the disease are starting to spread -- with journalists reporting on it from other parts of the country.

Picture of Ryan White

Los Angeles Times health reporter Anna Gorman believes first person health stories can be appropriate. That's why she shared about her deeply personal decision too undergo breast and ovarian surgeries to dramatically lower her own cancer risk.

Picture of Anna Gorman

With all the media coverage of health reform, there has been surprisingly little reporting about community health centers. Their story is an important one -- and can be told from anywhere in the U.S. I started with many ideas, but quickly set them aside and let the reporting dictate the stories.

Picture of William Heisel

After his two children were killed by a driver high on painkillers, Bob Pack worked with California's existing database of prescriptions to create what he called "a built-in red flag system" to help identify prescription drug abuse.

Picture of William Heisel

The Los Angeles Times found that in four Southern California counties there was more than one death every day from drugs that a doctor prescribed. Can doctors be disciplined for their patients' overdosing?

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Whooping cough resurgence, a better way of assessing body fat, the counterfeit Avastin saga and more from our Daily Briefing.

Pages

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth