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The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
A bag of local organic produce — from fresh corn to tomatoes to broccoli to snap peas — would typically cost more than $30 to buy at any store or farmers markets. But for workers at two Louisville companies, the same bag will cost just $5 this summer.
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In the “Compassionate City,” governmental unity has helped to reduce child poverty rates.
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Deep within the hallways of Western Middle School for the Arts, a garden-topped fish tank invites passersby to watch food production at work.
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Since 2016, more than a dozen grocery stores have closed citywide, often abandoning neighborhoods that already had some of the worst options for fresh food.
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Across the country, students from low-income households are enrolling in college at increasing rates — with 39 percent of undergraduates falling at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty line in 2016, according to data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.
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Last week, the Courier Journal published a series of stories that explored food access in Louisville. The articles showed how inadequate access to groceries can lead to health disparities in predominantly low-income neighborhoods.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Across Louisville, more than 44,000 people live within food deserts, meaning they can't easily get healthy, affordable food. Here are some key takeaways from The Courier Journal's coverage of the issue.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The resurgence in the Louisville business community’s interest in socially responsible companies is evident in the popularity of Canopy, a new initiative to foster businesses that do good as an integral part of their overall mission.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

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