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low-income

Picture of Jocelyn Wiener
Why are so many young children in California not being screened for developmental issues, despite clear guidelines that they should be?
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
California spends an estimated $4 to $5 billion a year on mental health services for children and teens. Our goal is to find out whether access to mental health care is equitable across the state, as required by law.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Harvey Barkin wrote this story while participating in the USC Center for Health Journalism‘s California Fellowship.  Other stories in the series include: Full-scope Medi-Cal granted to undocumented children below 19 years old but for how long? Isabella's story
Picture of Louise McCarthy
Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), community clinics have played an important role providing care for newly insured Americans. Funding for programs that enable community clinics to meet patient's needs will expire on September 30th, if Congress doesn’t act.
Picture of Rebecca  Adams
Minnesota officials knew they would exhaust Children’s Health Insurance Program money by the end of this year and likely be out of money for coverage of low-income children and pregnant women by the end of September. And Congress will probably not meet a deadline to help.
Picture of Monica Velez
Even if the county ever gets a medical school, it is a long-term goal years away and many low-income patients need solutions now.
Picture of Monica Velez
For years Merced County has struggled to convince doctors to come live and work in the rural, impoverished Central Valley community, resulting in a ratio of about 45 doctors for every 100,000 residents.
Picture of Monica Velez
Horisons Unlimited Health Care filed for bankruptcy and closed all eight of its clinics, including five in Merced County. About 80 percent of Horisons patients were on Medi-Cal.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Christin Farmer knew she wanted to help women have babies at 16, when she watched an episode of TLC's "A Baby Story" and saw a midwife with a birthing center delivering babies.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
Birth attendants can positively affect outcomes for mothers and infants. But access to them is often out of reach for low-income and minority women, who have the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality.

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