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I wrote a piece recently for Health News Review about conflicts of interest. The original post is below, followed by more great examples of writers describing unexpected conflicts in detail.

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Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley was just doing his job. In response to his watchdog stories on medical malpractice, federal officials yanked public portions of a national doctor database offline and threatened him with fines. Now, journalists are pushing back.

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More than 200 Native American doctors are attending a conference in Portland this week to look at health disparities affecting tribes across the nation.

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Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

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The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

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A California HMO dramatically improves blood pressure control, Americans oppose Medicaid overhaul, and an update on kids' access to dental care, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Reaching poor people with dental care means unraveling so many other things, including the isolation, difficult living conditions, fear and other burdens of poverty.

Picture of Mary Otto

If you want to know how tough someone’s life has been, look inside his mouth. Teeth are made of the hardest substance in the human body. But poverty, neglect and disease can crack them, break them, ruin them. The patients at the SOME dental clinic on O Street NW have been through a lot. Their teeth tell the story.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why are part-time elected officials in California getting such expensive full-time health benefits? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Dr. Carl Elliott is a brave man. A bioethicist with an MD, Elliott took on powerful interests at his own university on behalf of a woman he barely knew and a patient he could not save.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

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