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Picture of Terria  Smith

Mary Belardo drives down the half-mile dirt road to her home. Her house – built by All Mission Indian Housing Authority – sits on a nearly 40 acre allotment on the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indian Reservation in Thermal, Calif.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

What got me interested in San Lucas was contaminated drinking water there, but my reporting revealed deeper issues like the ability of local government to function, how to do business in a town without water, and tense dynamics between government and the private sector.

Picture of Taunya English

In-home upgrades are supposed to help kids avoid asthma attacks, missed school days and visits to the emergency room.

Picture of Liza Gross

Where you live—and who you are—plays a big part in how long you’ll live. If you live in poverty in California’s San Joaquin Valley, and you're Latino, you’re twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is white and lives in an upper-class community.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

It's a rare instance when groundwater contamination can be linked to a specific polluter and specific practices, but the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board has ordered a Monterey County landowner and grower to provide a drinkable water supply.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

I'm honored to be participating in the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship in LA later this month. My fellowship proposal is a deeper look at groundwater contamination, with arsenic and nitrates identified as the two worst offenders.

Picture of William Heisel

When I was growing up, I feared radon....

Picture of Deborah Petersen

I wrote this column for the San Jose Mercury News http://www.mercurynews.com/our-say/ci_21205836 about being married without children, and I was surprised how quickly I was sent stories from other parents without children. I hope to host a live chat next week, and hoped to find experts in this topic, whether a pscyhologist, fertility expert or...

Picture of Roseann Langlois

Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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