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Medi-Cal

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

An unlikely coalition of health insurers, labor and consumer advocates are pushing for controls on high-cost drugs in the nation's most populous state. “California is truly ground zero for this fight,” one advocate said. “It is clear Congress as a whole is not going to take meaningful action."

Picture of Judy  Silber

A complaint filed this week alleges that California is engaging in unlawful discrimination by paying some of the lowest reimbursement rates in the country to the state’s Medicaid providers. As some coverage pointed out, the notion that low rates are limiting access to doctors is “not unfounded."

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

California says the expense of new hep C drugs has nothing to do with who is prescribed them. But the question lingers: With some 200,000 people living with hep C in Medi-Cal, how much of a factor is cost in determining which patients receive treatment?

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

New hepatitis C treatments are both staggeringly effective and expensive. This has sparked a nationwide discussion about the high cost of specialty drugs and how such costs are keeping patients from needed treatments. Prescribing data may offer new insights.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Facing a $55-million deficit during the Great Recession, Sacramento County officials made a choice: To save money, they would close their free health clinics to people who entered the country illegally. Six years later, they want to reverse that decision.

Picture of Ryan White

While states such as Texas and Florida have repeatedly rejected efforts to expand Medicaid in the first place, California is on the verge of expanding public health coverage to include undocumented children. But will they be able to find access to care in an already crowded Medicaid system?

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

For uninsured California immigrants, which side of a county line they live can significantly affect the care available when they're sick. And Obamacare reforms are complicating choices for local officials as they consider what, if any, healthcare should be provided for the remaining uninsured.

Picture of Tracy  Seipel

Some state lawmakers are trying help Californians by expanding the number of Medi-Cal providers following the explosive growth of the state's health plan for the poor under the Affordable Care Act. California's Medicaid program now serves almost a third of the state's population.

Picture of Rita Beamish

"It's not your grandmother's Medi-Cal any more." California's version of Medicaid now provides health services for more than 12 million people, almost a third of all Californians. Medi-Cal insures more people than the populations of all but six states.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

California leads the nation when it comes to fostering the health of undocumented immigrants, according to a recent report. Meanwhile, state legislators are considering legislation that would expand coverage to undocumented residents.

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